Press Release

I started Bristolstuff.com 10 years ago with a goal to spread positive news in and around the Bristol area.

We had many years of success and the journey has been great.

In the last 12 months, I’ve come to realize that Theirs not much good news anymore .

I have took the decision to stop this site from the new year.

We are still running the bobgoff.co.uk website that is thriving from the Bristol music scene, go check it out !

Thank you once again for the loyal and continuous support you have shown us over the years

Yours sincerely,

S Powney   ( bristolstuff admin )

BRITAIN’S GOT REGGAE AUDITIONS BRISTOL

BRITAIN'S GOT REGGAE AUDITIONS

Posted by Stewart Powney on Friday, 24 March 2017

Filmed at the auditions at Studio 7 f6-18 King Square,
BRISTOL BS2 8JL is for Reggae singers in the surrounding areas.

Prizes confirmed so far for the winner is:
A recording project with Stingray Records
To perform at One Love Festival 2017

Performing on the night was winner of Britain’s Got Reggae 2016/17 Claire Angel from Birmingham whose career has taken off to a next level since her win and will be open to questions about her journey through other competition and what it has meant to her and her music career.

St Paul’s Carnival – Back on !

Good news for St Paul’s Carnival fans – Bristol Mayor vows to bring it backdefault

 

ST Paul’s Carnival will go ahead either next year or in 2018, Bristol’s new Mayor has vowed.

Marvin Rees announced at last night’s cabinet meeting that he had already spoken to organizers about ways to secure the festival’s future.

This will be the second consecutive year the event. which attracts around 100,000 revelers annually, has not taken place.

A huge question mark was thrown over the event when the city council pulled its support for the committee last November, claiming it had lost confidence in the organizers.

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At the same time a carnival commission was set up, involving community groups, businesses and people who take part in the carnival to look at how best to organize the event and secure its future.

Mr Rees said: “We are committed to making sure it goes ahead with the commission, when they come back with their report.

“The question I had for them was did they think it was viable to come in 2018 or 2017? They are being a bit quiet about it but I think they are very keen to come back next year.

“But i think there are lessons we can learn from this about the skills mismatch across different communities in Bristol.

“I want to ensure expertise that are available to certain parts of the city and community are available to other parts of the community and their events as well.”

Love Saves the Day: What you can and cannot take to the two-day festival

This weekend Love Saves the Day will be taking over Eastville Park for two days.

The site is open from 11am, and once you are inside there is no re-entry.

So you need to make sure you have everything you need with you when you enter.

What you need to bring:

Identification.

And not just to buy alcohol either.

Love Saves the Day is open to all ages but under-18s must be accompanied by an adult. So if you planning to take a younger relative along with you, then you may want to make sure you don’t leave your driving license at home.

Of course Challenge 25 will be in operation at the bars.

Toilet paper or tissue.

The toilets will be cleaned and restocked through out the day, but the chances are you will find yourself in at least one that is due some new loo rol.

You don’t want to find yourself without any.

Raincoat and sunscreen.

The weather is unpredictable at the best of times. So you need to be prepared.

A small tube of sun cream and a light rain coat you can put in your bag will keep you dry and your skin safe.

Umbrella

Small umbrellas are usually allowed past security, but you will not be able to open them while the acts are on stage.

What you cannot bring:

Food and drink.

Outside food and drink (including alcohol) is not allowed inside the festival, with the exception of attendees with specific dietary requirements backed up by a doctor’s note.

This is a condition of the festival’s license and it is something they must enforce in order to secure permission for the event to go ahead.

There are, however, plenty of bars and Smoothy’s  and traders providing refreshments all day long as well as ample water points.

Fireworks, laser pens, or flares.

Alcohol, illicit drugs, or ‘legal highs’ including nitrous oxide.

Animals (with the exception of guide dogs).

Selfie sticks

Anything which could be considered an offensive weapon.

Bristol band Portishead win Outstanding Contribution to British Music award at Ivor Novellos

bethBeth Gibbons from Portishead which won the Outstanding Contribution to British Music award at the Ivors

Portishead, one of the biggest bands to come out of Bristol, scooped the Outstanding Contribution to British Music gong at the Ivor Novello awards.

Band member Geoff Barrow also won the award for Best Original Film Score, which he share with Ben Salisbury for their production of the Ex Machina soundtrack.

The ceremony was held in London on Thursday night and other winners include the likes of Adele and James Bay.

Portishead formed in Bristol in 1991 and, along with Barrow, also includes Beth Gibbons and Adrian Utley.

The Ivor Novello Awards are presented by the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers and Authors and are awarded for songwriting and composing.

The ceremony was held at the Grosvenor House Hotel.

BASCA chairman Stephen McNeff said: “Today’s awards have recognised both young and emerging talent as well as established names, whilst celebrating the enduring catalogues of some of our outstanding songwriters and composers.”

Adele took home the Songwriter of the Year prize, while James Bay was handed the prize for Most Performed Work.

Other winners included Bryan Adams and Blur’s Damon Albarn.

The life and death of DJ Derek, an unlikely reggae legend

1825DJ Derek with Don Letts at the Silver Bullet, London.

For Jenny Griffiths, eight months in limbo ended with a phone call shortly before midday on 11 March. A body had been found in the woods near the Cribbs Causeway shopping centre, north of Bristol. Personal effects strongly suggested that it was Jenny’s missing great-uncle Derek Serpell-Morris, better known as DJ Derek.

For 50 years, Derek had been a fixture of the Bristol music scene, DJing reggae, ska, rocksteady, dancehall and R&B. Over the past two decades, he had become a national cult figure, playing to packed venues across England and appearing in the video for Dizzee Rascal’s Dirtee Disco. Beyond the novelty value of a white former accountant playing Jamaican music, his love of the music and culture was sincere and profound.

“He was a reggae encyclopedia,” says his friend Don Letts, the film-maker and 6 Music DJ. “He taught me about the importance of culture in bringing people together. He was an English treasure.”

The 73-year-old’s disappearance last July was national news, boosted on social media by Bristolian musicians such as Roni Size and Portishead’s Geoff Barrow. The media covered every development in a search that turned Jenny, who was Derek’s informal personal assistant for a decade, into both family spokeswoman and amateur detective. With that phone call, however, the search was over. The most famous missing person in Britain was no longer missing.

“I prepared myself for the worst, but I stayed strong and didn’t let anything get to me,” Jenny says five days later. “I didn’t cry and I didn’t grieve. So when I had the phone call that confirms your worst nightmare, it was a shock. Maybe I’m still in shock.” Her voice is soft and weary. “I don’t think it’s hit me yet. I haven’t had that crying session yet where you just break down.”

DJ Derek in 2007.
Derek DJing in 2007.

Jenny and her grandmother, Derek’s twin sister Shirley, are sipping tea in Jenny’s living room. The 29-year-old learning support assistant is between jobs, so since last July her sole focus, apart from raising her two children, has been looking for Derek.

“We had concern for Jennifer because she’s been so active,” Shirley says. “This activity can keep you going to a certain extent, but we did try to warn her that after a while, if he hadn’t been found, there had to be a moment when she stops.”

“Which I wouldn’t have done,” Jenny says firmly. “I’d have carried on and carried on.”

 

While we’re talking, Avon and Somerset police announce that DNA tests have confirmed the body is Derek. Jenny’s phone vibrates constantly with condolences and interview requests.

Derek’s disappearance was unusual. Up to 300,000 people are reported missing in England every year, but the vast majority are found within 48 hours and rarely is a missing person well known. Derek was particularly loved in Bristol. In recent years, he received the Lord Mayor’s medal and a certificate from the people of Bristol declaring him an OBE, or “Outstanding Bristolian Entertainer”. “I remember getting on a bus with Derek once and everyone started clapping,” says Jenny. “That’s how well known he was.”

Before Derek’s disappearance, Letts and Daddy G from Massive Attack were making a documentary that entwined his biography with the story of race relations in Bristol. Daddy G calls him “an ambassador for cultural exchange”. Letts goes further: “He’s a testament to the power of music to change individuals and, in so doing, change the idea of what it means to be British.”

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Jennie and Shirley Griffiths.

Jennie and Shirley Griffiths. Derek was born in Bristol in 1941, the second son of a carpenter and a housewife. “He was very introvert,” Shirley remembers. “Nobody ever really knew what he was thinking. If I could have summed him up then, I would have said he was going to be eccentric.”
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Derek played washboard in a skiffle group and drummed in a rock’n’roll band before finding a job as an accountant for the Cadbury-owned chocolate company Fry’s. In the early 1960s, he discovered Jamaican music and began attending parties in the St Paul’s district. “I didn’t tell a lot of my white friends,” he wrote in Crossfade, a 2004 essay anthology produced by the Big Chill festival. “It wasn’t worth the hassle. Because all you got was: ‘Oh, it’s rough down there, I wouldn’t go down there.’”

Daddy G had known Derek since he was a child in the 60s. “When my parents first came to England, there wasn’t any infrastructure for the West Indians to integrate with English people, so they used to hold parties themselves,” he says. “Derek was a real novelty to my parents because he was a white guy who had embraced their culture. He was probably the blackest white man that people knew in Bristol.”

In the mid-70s, Derek’s life was upended. Within five years he lost both parents, divorced his first wife and had a brief, volatile second marriage. Oxford DJ Aidan Larkin met Derek regularly and discussed ghostwriting his memoirs, so he knows more about Derek’s past than almost anyone. “The time they [Derek and his second wife] spent together was pretty horrific,” he says. “I think that was the fulcrum of his whole story. I think it’s fair to say in modern terminology that he had a nervous breakdown.”

In 1978, Derek moved into the small basement flat in St Paul’s where he spent the rest of his life, and quit his job. “I didn’t really want to spend the rest of my life totting up figures relating to chocolate bars,” he said in a 1994 BBC documentary. He found DJ work at the Star & Garter, a West Indian pub where customers thanked him for bringing back memories of home, hence his full stage name DJ Derek Sweet Memory Sounds.

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BBC documentary DJ Derek’s Sweet Memory Sounds.

“He lost his home, his job, everything,” says Larkin, “and the black community got him back on his feet. He was totally adopted by them.”
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“I think he sometimes felt the odd one out,” says Shirley. “And then he found all this love and affection from the black community. Maybe he felt that was more like a family for him.”

The BBC documentary gave Derek nationwide exposure, and by the mid-2000s he was regularly playing such festivals as Glastonbury and Womad, had monthly residencies in London and Oxford, released a compilation album on Trojan Records and toured with reggae legends such as the Wailers. He usually ended his set with One Love by Bob Marley, a song that summed up his belief in bringing people together.

“It’s one of those classic word-of-mouth things. It just grew and grew,” says Big Chill founder Pete Lawrence. “It was great that such an unlikely person could become a superstar within particular communities. He was massively loved by so many people.”

3326Derek switched from vinyl to MiniDisc (“He backed the wrong horse there,” says Larkin) but still introduced each record in Jamaican patois, which he had learned in a Bristol barber shop. “I found the contrast of this bespectacled old Englishman in his cardigans and fancy waistcoats throwing down some serious Jamaican slanguage quite endearing,” says Letts. “I don’t know anyone who had a problem with it.” Older Jamaican artists loved him. When Derek introduced himself to Toots Hibbert of ska veterans Toots and the Maytals, Hibbert replied: “You don’t have to tell me who you are. You’re the white man who talks the people’s talk and plays the people’s music.”

Derek’s friends became used to his quirks and rituals. They remember him as gentle, good-humoured and scrupulously well-mannered, but prone to complaining loudly when his routine was disrupted. The former accountant remained methodical and frugal in every area of his life. He had a ringbinder full of vinyl catalogue numbers, a cupboard crammed with annotated bus timetables and a giant map of England studded with pins to mark the locations of Wetherspoon pubs. Between gigs, he enjoyed journeying around England on his free bus pass to visit new Wetherspoon branches. “He used to plan his journeys strategically,” says Letts. “It was a military exercise.”

Derek was stubbornly independent. He never remarried or had children, which Shirley suspects may have been his only regret. “He would have been a wonderful father, I think. I don’t really know how he felt. He was a very private man.” His bachelor’s flat was a base rather than a home, with no central heating, hot water, TV or food in the fridge. “I think it was just a place for Derek to sleep,” says Jenny.
DJ Derek at the Larmer Tree festival in 2008.

Derek could usually be found at the Commercial Rooms, a Wetherspoons in central Bristol, drinking pints of Ruddles with the regulars. “He was a lovely bloke,” says his friend Steve Noble. “I didn’t have a bad word for him. He’d get a group of girls coming over: ‘DJ Derek! Can we have a photo?’ He loved that. He’d say to me: ‘Look, ladies’ man tonight.’” He grows quiet. “I’m still looking at the door now, waiting for him to walk through. It’s a big part missing.”

In 2013, Derek decided to retire from regular DJing, telling Jenny that he was tired of the late nights and would only play occasional special shows. The gig he played with Letts in Bristol on New Year’s Eve 2014 turned out to be his last. Jenny later learned that he had opened a savings account for his retirement but, like his pension, it was never touched.

Jenny and Shirley last saw Derek at a family wedding on 13 June last year. When he left, he said he would meet Jenny soon to go through a backlog of Facebook messages and buy a laptop. He had told Letts and Daddy G that he was looking forward to resuming the documentary. “He said he was looking forward to moving forward,” Letts says with a heavy sigh. “He was a trip, man. They ain’t going to make them like that any more.”

The last time Noble drank with Derek at the Commercial Rooms was 10 July 2015. When he didn’t show up on subsequent evenings, Noble initially assumed that Derek, who didn’t own a mobile, was on one of his solitary Wetherspoons jaunts, but after a week he began to worry. Eventually, he reached Jenny through a mutual friend, and Derek was reported missing on 24 July.

“He didn’t want people keeping tabs on him,” Jenny says. “We didn’t live in each other’s pockets. That’s why it took so long to report him missing.”

There were few clues. His bank card hadn’t been used since 6 July and his passport was found in his flat. CCTV footage showed that he had visited the Criterion pub in St Paul’s after leaving the Commercial Rooms on 10 July, while bus company records revealed that he had boarded a number 78 bus to Thornbury, 12 miles north of Bristol, at 10.32 the next morning. After that, his movements were a mystery.

The family considered every possibility: he had killed himself; he had been hit by a car; he had been mugged and fatally injured; he had fallen into a ditch. More optimistically, it was possible that he was lying, unidentified, in a hospital somewhere, or perhaps he had staged a vanishing act. “Maybe he wanted to be known as the legendary Bristol DJ who just disappeared,” Jenny remembers thinking. “Maybe that’s how he wanted to go out.”

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A search for Derek in Bristol, July 2015.

Derek’s friends joined searches of the woodland around Thornbury, played fundraisers and kept the story in the public eye. Bar a few cranks and trolls, the public response was overwhelmingly supportive. “All this wonderful coverage and care from people I don’t even know, that’s what you’ve got to hang on to,” says Shirley. “If he hadn’t been famous, there wouldn’t be any of this.”
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Jenny explored every avenue, even accepting help from several psychics. “I take it with a pinch of salt, but I wouldn’t leave any stone untouched.” Her own sleuthing was restricted by confidentiality laws. Had she been able to access bus company records herself, she thinks now, they might have helped lead her to Cribbs Causeway. “It’s bloody difficult,” she says angrily. Meanwhile, all leads and possible sightings reported to the police turned out to be red herrings.

“There have been times when I’ve felt like shutting myself away and denying it all,” says Shirley. “I can bear it but I can’t bear too much. The wondering every day if you’re going to hear something: is today going to be the day?”

As time went on, his friends and family began looking for clues as to Derek’s state of mind. Larkin remembers Derek first mentioning retirement when they spoke in January 2013 about summer DJ bookings. “He said: ‘I might not still be here in July. It’s not unknown for people at my time of life to drop dead. And it’s happened to people I know.’ So I think it was on his mind.”

He sold or gave away his vinyl and reacted strangely when Larkin gave him a retirement gift: an album of photographs and gig flyers. “He got a little bit embarrassed and went quiet,” says Larkin. “It was like he was suppressing some kind of emotion.” Before Derek’s body was found, Larkin says: “I’d come to the opinion that he might have taken his own life. Little things he’d said and done had led me to that way of thinking.”

Shirley, meanwhile, couldn’t get out of her head a conversation with Derek at the wedding. He had said that, were his physical or mental health to fail, he didn’t want to be looked after. “So don’t be surprised,” he added cryptically. He hadn’t seen his GP since 2010, but Shirley later learned that he had complained to Noble of a pain in his face the last night they met. “I feel quite strongly that he wasn’t going to say, so he just dropped a few hints about how he was feeling,” she says. “I think he was iller than he was letting on.”

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Derek and Jennie. Photograph: Courtesy of Jennifer Griffiths

As summer turned into autumn, hope dwindled, especially when he failed to reappear for a DJ gig for rave collective Arcadia in Queen Square, Bristol. “The moment I gave up hope that Derek was alive was when he didn’t turn up for his Arcadia set,” Jenny says. “He would not have missed that for the world. I knew I was looking for his body, that was my feeling. I wasn’t looking for a live person any more.”

The uncertainty became too painful. On 2 March, Derek’s older brother Gerald, his next of kin, made an application under the 2013 Presumption of Death Act so that his bank accounts, which were still paying his rent and bills, could be closed and a memorial service held. Nine days later, exactly eight months after his final bus journey, Derek’s body was found. “It’s weird,” Jenny says quietly.

The discovery has given Derek’s family partial closure, but it may be impossible to determine the cause of death from a body that has spent eight months in the open air. While we’re talking, the police call to ask to see Shirley and Jenny again. “See how I mean it goes on?” says Shirley, dipping her head. “Why? What? How? When?”

“I feel guilty that I was looking in the wrong places,” says Jenny. “I went to see the spot the other day and I felt physically sick to think that he’d been there on his own for the whole eight months, right by a busy road. I feel sick that it took so bloody long to find him. I don’t feel like I did enough.”

“That’s natural,” Shirley says gently. “You will feel like that, Jenny, but you did more than enough.”

“He didn’t deserve to have a death like that,” says Jenny. “I’d rather he’d had a heart attack while he was DJing because at least then he’d have died doing something he loved.”

She still cannot grieve. She thinks that will only happen when Derek is laid to rest in April. Her memories, at least, are sweet.

“Derek always had a quote: ‘Live the life you love and love the life you live,’” she says with a tired smile. “And that’s exactly what he did. He lived his life and loved it. So I’m at peace with that bit. He’s done amazing.”

BBC’s Soul Britannia Segment About Massive Attack And The Bristol Sound

The original bad man Daddy G. We love the current Bristol Sound and the artists

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This clip was taken from the Soul Britannia documentary series originally aired on BBC4 back in March 2007. It focused on how R’n’B, soul and hip-hop has influenced British music.
The Massive Attack portion of the series, uploaded here, has interviews with Daddy G (no introduction required!), Jazzie B (Soul 2 Soul) , Roots Manuva, Beverley Knight and Trevor Nelson.

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DJ Die & Gutterfunk – Win – Culture Clash Bristol

DJ Die & Gutterfunk win Culture Clash Bristol

Watch the hometown crew triumph over Butterz Sound, Team Tectonic and Stylo G’s Warning Sound.
          DJ Die Presents Gutterfunk celebrate

What. A. Show. Four crews, four stages, four rounds – but there can only be one winner, and this time it was Bristol drum’n’bass titan

DJ Die and his Gutterfunk family who walked off with the prestigious airhorn trophy.

Going into battle

It was by no means a forgone conclusion, with powerful competition coming from all quarters. Butterz Sound looked like early leaders, with Elijah and Skilliam taking a seat in comfortable easy chairs and flicking through newspapers as Gutterfunk opened the first round. That, plus P Money on the mic and choice cuts including The Bug’s Skeng and Kanye West’s Who Gone Stop Me put Butterz one up at the end of round one.

Team Tectonic started out deep and moody, and the decibel meter at the end of the first round suggested perhaps the crowd were a bit too hyped to go with them. But they rallied hard, bringing out Riko and Lady Chann (an ex-girlfriend of Stylo G MC Stormin – that’s gotta hurt) and veering between seismic dubstep, jungle and thundering reggae. It’s an approach that wiped the face off Warning Sound’s face come the Sleeping With The Enemy Round, where the purpose is to bite another sound’s style.

If you’re here and on this stage, you put a lot of your lifetime into making music, and that gets a lot of respect from me

DJ Die

It was the team next to them who occasionally looked like they had it in the bag. Stylo G’s Warning Sound had an almost limitless supply of killer dubplates – from So Solid Crew’s 21 Seconds to Section Boyz’ Lock Aff to a Beenie Man cut shipped over from Jamaica. They had some killer guests too, including Lethal Bizzle (“You don’t just play the 45… you bring out the f—ing artist!”) and a ready-for-war Chip – who unfortunately was cut off mere seconds after his arrival, when the timer ran out at the close of round three. “We want Chip!” chanted the audience. Don’t worry, he’s coming back – you think a clock’s going to stop him?

Courtney Pine to bring his House of Legends event to Bristol International Jazz and Blues Festival

 

34Renowned musician Courtney Pine cannot wait to be a part of Bristol International Jazz and Blues Festival.

The saxophonist, considered to be one of the pioneers of the black British jazz scene, will be bringing his House of Legends event to the programme running between March 18 and 20.

Deeply steeped in the traditions of the Caribbean, this very personal project sees Courtney bring together musicians from all over for vibrant exchanges that tell tales of life from a truly multicultural view.

Courtney explained: “House of Legends, which I’ve been doing for four years, is all about the Caribbean and the positive affect the culture has had on people.”

Visitors to the event, taking place on the concluding day of the festival, will learn about the heritage of the Notting Hill Carnival.

Courtney said: “We tell the story of Claudia Jones and how she started the event. Not many people know the efforts of this journalist first putting the event together but it made a huge influence on this country.”

In the 1980s, Courtney, 51, was one of the first black British musicians to make a serious mark on the jazz scene when he released his first album.

Londoner Courtney, who became the first and only, to date, black jazz musician to appear on the NME front cover, in 1986, is delighted to be part of Bristol festival.

He said: “All jazz events are uplifting but this event is something a little different and very special.13165152-large

“The fact they have kept the event going for so long shows that they are clearly doing

“With the history of Lord Colston and Colston Hall it is pretty interesting to have a geezer, like me, in there doing something on Caribbean culture.”

Courtney truly believes the festival offers something to die hard jazz fans as well as those who are just picking the genre up.

“There’s a certain type of jazz fan who treats the genre as an item exclusive to them but then there are the real fans who appreciate it is for everyone,” he explained.

“Whether you are an experienced jazz fan or a newbie you will enjoy this festival.

“I love coming to Bristol too. Over the years, I have tried to do my best to understand Bristol’s heritage and I’m always learning things every time I go back.”

Over artists, on a packed Bristol International Jazz and Blues Festival, include Pee Wee Ellis and Fred Wesley, Maceo Parker, Christian McBride and Edgar Meyer amongst others.

For ticket details and to see the full festival line up visit www.bristoljazzandbluesfest.com.

Let’s Rock Bristol People be aware of – Gigantic Tickets Rip Off Scam !

headerPlus win a pair free tickets to Ashton Court on Saturday, Just come up with the best rip off story that you have encountered with Gigantic, The winners will be announced in June 2016, Just add your comments on this story here and the winners will be informed and contacted via bristolstuff.com website !

Gigantic Tickets Be aware off the scams and No Refunds At All !

As you can see its just a massive RIP OFF   ,

Be aware that it could happen to you too !

Let’s Rock Bristol! Ticket’s   by Gigantic Rip Off Ticket Merchant’s

Beware if you buy tickets off this grubby little bunch of rip off merchants. Their terms and conditions mean that if the event is cancelled they will refuse point blank to refund the booking fees

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Ripped-Off-By-Gigantic’s reply to Andiamo’s Comment

Written on: 16/11/2013

★☆☆☆☆

I believe many ticket agencies refund booking fees if the event is cancelled. Fatsoma for one. Gigantic didn’t even send out the tickets and still wouldn’t refund the booking fee.
In many cases you don’t get a choice of booking agents- a promoter gives exclusive selling rights to a bunch of bandits like Gigantic and then you are screwed over if the event is pulled. So if the link takes you to Gigantic, I’d suggest trying to buy from the venue directly, as I’ve found they may have more scruples than Gigantic.

http://www.reviewcentre.com/Online-Ticket-Agencies/Gigantic-www-gigantic-com-review_2339962

Customer service NOT helpful, never received the tickets!

Written on: 03/12/2015 by Celinel

★☆☆☆☆

I am extremely disappointed in this compagny. I had bought tickets exactly one month in advance for a show in London. They said they would dispatch the tickets “at least 10 days prior to the event” which they did not since I received an email 9 days prior to the event (which you can agree is still okay, but you will see how this is a problem) saying my tickets had been dispatched and would be with me within 5 working days. I received an email on a friday (for the show the next sunday) and 5 working days would be the next friday, so I had NO reason to worry… Evidently, I did not receive the tickets on the friday so I tried to contact them, but not answer… I then sent emails asking to be refunded, but their answer was that I should have contacted them 2 days before the event: but how should I have contacted them since my tickets were SUPPOSED to arrive on the friday and they are closed on weekends………….
I then had a very useless exchange of emails with a manager…

I am so disappointed.. What’s the point of buying tickets ONE MONTH before an event if they only send it barely a week before?!
I DO NOT RECOMMEND!

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Gigantic Rip Off

★☆☆☆☆

“Where are my tickets”

Written on: 18/03/2015

This company is a joke, the charge you a handling fee and then fail to actually handle the tickets. I have yet to receive my tickets as apparently the promoter has still yet to send the, but another set I brought from an other company arrived already. there only comment is that if the tickets failed to arrive they will “see what they can do for me” NOT good enough. Seeing that the tickets are a birthday present I’m pretty hacked off with this can’t be ass to do our job attitude coming from this rip of of a company but advise use an other company.

This one will take your money and do nothing to supply a service.

http://www.reviewcentre.com/Online-Ticket-Agencies/Gigantic-www-gigantic-com-review_3270857

#Bristol6Music – What’s on your Bristol music playlist?

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On Sunday’s Now Playing (6-8pm) we’re raising the curtain on next week’s 6 Music Festival in Brizzle.

Some may argue that Bristol’s most iconic attraction is Brunel’s wonderful Clifton Suspension Bridge, which has spanned the Avon Gorge for 150 years. But we would say, “Surely the finest example of Bristolian culture is Massive Attack?”

Tricky-I-wasnt-any-good-f-011Roni Size & Krust (1)

 

 

 

 

Of course you’ll get great views of the bridge from Clifton village, and a fine view from below at Cumberland Basin, but have you listened to Portishead’s seminal album ‘Dummy’?

Perhaps these two giants of Avon-based pioneering trip-hop will be the most selected on Sunday’s Now Playing, but they are also the tip of the South West music scene iceberg, which is clearly why we’ve chosen the Bristol to host next weekend’s 6 Music Festival.

IMG_12150047- A Restoration of Sound-8379

 

The jewel of the South West can boast million-selling bands, iconic solo performers and even a genre all of its own (the Bristol Sound).

6279193-largeiBen Westbeech - Interview

 

 

 

 

Choose any Bristol-born artist from Tricky, Roni Size, Redlight, Breach, DJ Die, Bugsy,  Robert Wyatt, and Strangelove to artists from slightly further afield such as Bath’s Propellerheads or Tears For Fears, or even Weston-Super-Mere’s Wurzels. We’re sure you can do much better than that.

You could do much worse than choose from any number of artists playing at this year’s 6 Music Festival, discover the full line-up here.

Buggsy - Gully Side

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Get your South West-inspired suggestions to Tom via the hashtag #Bristol6Music to help create a playlist. Comment on the Now Playing Facebook page,  on the blog, email nowplaying@bbc.co.uk or drag tracks onto our Spotify playlist.